Essay on Supernatural in Hamlet

751 Words Jul 18th, 2000 4 Pages
In the time of William Shakespeare there was a strong belief in the existence of the supernatural. Thus, the supernatural is a recurring aspect in many of Shakespeare's plays. In two such plays, Hamlet and Macbeth, the supernatural is an integral part of the structure of the plot. It provides a catalyst for action, an insight into character, and augments the impact of many key scenes. The supernatural appears to the audience in many varied forms. In Hamlet, the most notable form of the supernatural that appears is the ghost. However, in Macbeth, a ghost, a floating dagger, witches, and prophetic apparitions make appearances. The role of the supernatural is very important in Hamlet and Macbeth. The role that the supernatural plays …show more content…
He now listens to it, "Speak to her, Hamlet". In Hamlet, the supernatural is the guiding force behind the character of Hamlet. The ghost asks Hamlet to seek revenge for the King's death and Hamlet is thus propelled to set into action a series of events that ends in Hamlet's death. The supernatural is a re-occurring event in Macbeth. It is present in all the scenes with the witches, the appearance of Banquo's ghost, the prophecies the apparitions bring, and in the air-drawn dagger that guides Macbeth towards his victim. Of the supernatural phenomenon evident in Macbeth, the witches are perhaps the most important. The witches represent Macbeth's evil ambitions. They are the catalysts, which unleash Macbeth's evil aspirations. Macbeth believes the witches and wishes to know more about the future so after the banquet he seeks them out at their cave. He wants to know the answers to his questions regardless of whether the consequences are violent and destructive to nature. The witches promise to answer and at Macbeth¹s choice they add further unnatural ingredients to the cauldron and call up their masters. This is where the prophetic apparitions appear. The first apparition is Macbeth's own head (later to be cut off by Macduff) confirming his fears of Macduff. The second apparition tells Macbeth that he can not be harmed by anyone who is born by a woman. This knowledge gives Macbeth a false sense of

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