Billabon in New Zealand Essay

861 Words 4 Pages
Billabon in New Zealand

To: All Managers of the Organization

From:

Subject: Billabong in New Zealand

This memo includes a brief overview of Billabong and why New Zealand is a potential international market. You will also be informed of what type of government this country upholds, focusing on political and legal systems. There is also an explanation for each phase of government. You’ll find that I’ve provided a little information on the country’s main tourist attraction for activities that pertain to Billabong’s mission as surf, skate, snow, and wake company.

Billabong, as you may or may not know, is a surf and extreme sports clothing and accessories brand. Some products they
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She is represented in the country by an appointed Governor General. (nationmaster.com, 2005)

The executive branch is headed by the Cabinet and they basically execute enacted laws. The Cabinet, then, is headed by an appointed Prime Minister, and this person is the majority party leader in the House of Representatives. (nationmaster.com, 2005)

The legislative branch, as already discussed, consists of a 120-member unicameral Parliament, meaning that it only has one chamber, the House of Representatives. Membership is served for three years and is either elected through proportional party representation or according to geographic electorate, with reserved seats for Maori members. Maori are the indigenous people of New Zealand and are the minority party. Everyone over 18 years of age can vote for Parliament members, including women who have been voting since 1893, 27 years prior to American women’s suffrage!! (nationmaster.com, 2005)

The judiciary branch consists of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Court of Appeals of New Zealand, the High Court, the District courts, and other courts and tribunals (nationmaster.com, 2005). All judges are appointed by the Governor General (The World Factbook, 2005). The legal system is based on English common law, certain United Kingdom Parliamentary statutes and

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