The Effectiveness of the Opening Scenes of Gary Sinise's Film Of Mice and Men in Comparison to Steinbeck's Novel

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The Effectiveness of the Opening Scenes of Gary Sinise's Film Of Mice and Men in Comparison to Steinbeck's Novel

Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men is a hard-hitting and powerful novel about 1930s America, in California. Steinbeck's intention in the book Of Mice and Men was to show that American society was damaged in this time and also in those days people had a lot of hopes and dreams but the wouldn't exist because people were too disaffected and selfish: ' nobody never gets to heaven and nobody never gets no land.'

Sinise's film was made in 1992 with the two most important characters of the film; Gary Sinise as George and John Malkovich as Lennie. In general the film was good although it missed
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Men have also worn the tree down to smoothness by sitting on it.

As soon as George and Lennie enter, the landscape 'dies'. This adds to the sense that humans destroy the land:

'For a moment, the place was lifeless and then two men emerged from the path and came into the opening of the green pool.'

At first, George and Lennie are described as strangers. Their names are not given and they are shown to be itinerant workers through their clothing: 'Both wore black shapeless hats and denim trouser and coats.' The word 'shapeless' suggests that the men have no direction of their life. At the start of the book they are anonymous, just as Crooks says to Lennie:

'I seen hundreds of men come by on the road…hundreds of them. They come and they quit and go on and every damn one of 'ems got a little piece of land in his head.'

This fits in with the whole novel because Steinbeck's shows us that George and Lennie are no different to all of the ranch workers of this time.

The film opens in darkness. Sinister, orchestral music is heard with a piano refrain. The music brings out an atmosphere of tension and suspense.

After a while the mise en scene starts

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