Would it be correct to say that in Tom Jones, Fielding considers marriage to be a mere socio- economic arrangements under which women feel continuously suppressed? Discuss.

995 Words Mar 15th, 2014 4 Pages
Would it be correct to say that in Tom Jones, Fielding considers marriage to be a mere socio- economic arrangements under which women feel continuously suppressed? Discuss.

The true history of the English countryside has been centred throughout in the problems of property in land, and in the consequent social and working relationships. By the eighteenth century, nearly half of the cultivated land was owned by some five thousand families. As a central form of this predominance, four hundred families, in a population of some seven or eight million people, owned nearly a quarter of the cultivated land.
In a society stressing male dominance, it is surprising to find an author who writes his female characters as more intelligent than and
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Fielding often shows that the place of the women is at home. This construction of separate spheres was a motor for the class formation. The middle class even made this central to their class identity.
But some historians had doubts about this rigid separation. They thought that the different spheres were permeable and fluid in the 18th century. But even if people could create their own individuality, they were all subject to gendered social rules and obligations, like class, age, occupation and religion.
During the 17th century, women played an active role in the family workshop. But under the more commercial system of economic organization which was developing in the 17th century, men became journeymen and day labourers and women lost their role as members of the trades through marriage and also their prime source of both training and employment.
Conception of women as an intellectual empty ornament: husband considered as the head of the woman. Duty of the wife is to obey her husband. Woman’s ornamental status wasn’t established only because of her economic uselessness: was also determined by her cultural construction as an accessory to masculine desire.
Throughout Tom Jones by Henry Fielding, there are many examples of marriage. There is Squire Western's marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Fitzpatrick's marriage, the mentions of Allworthy's wife, the marriage of Nightengale and Nancy, and the marriage of Nightengale's cousin and the

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